International

International Conventions and Women


Women’s Conventions represent all over the world the rights of the women. Such conventions tackle the toughest problems faced by women and girls the world over. Psychiatrists, women’s consultants, leadership advisers, career officers, crime analysts, police officers and parents tackle every problem with experienced solutions. Topics ranging from dowry to suicide, illiteracy to careers, health care to child-rearing are discussed in depth, providing all possible help and information.

 

International conventions related with women:

  1. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights
    The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was adopted by the UN General Assembly on 10 December 1948. It has been referred to as humanity’s Magna Carta as it Proclaims a common standard of human for all peoples and all nations.

    Source: www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/index.shtml
  2. Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others :
    The Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others is a resolution of the UN General Assembly which declares that "the traffic in persons for the purpose of prostitution are incompatible with the dignity and worth of the human person". It was approved by the General Assembly on 2 December 1949 and came into effect on 25 July 1951. At 2007, there were 74 states parties to the convention, in which countries the Convention applies. Additionally, five states have signed the convention but have not yet ratified it.

    Source: www2.ohchr.org/english/law/trafficpersons.htm
  3. ILO Convention No. 100 Equal Remuneration Convention, 1951
    Convention No. 100 establishes the principle of equal remuneration for men and women workers for work of equal value. The rationale of the Convention is that remuneration for work should be determined on the basis of the value of the work performed, rather than on the basis whether it is performed by men or women.

    Source: www.ilocarib.org.tt/projects/cariblex/pdfs/ILO_Convention_100.pdf -


  4. Convention relating to the Status of Refugees
    The United Nations Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees is an international convention that was approved at a special UN conference on 28 July 1951. It entered into force on 22 April 1954. It defines who is a refugee , and sets out the rights of individuals who are granted asylum and the responsibilities of nations that grant asylum. The convention also sets out which people do not qualify as refugees, such as war criminals. The Convention also provides for some visa-free travel for holders of travel documents issued under the convention.

    Source: www2.ohchr.org/english/law/pdf/refugees.pdf


  5. Convention on the Political Rights of Women
    Convention on the Politival Rights of Women was adopted by the United Nations-at
    the close of 1952, and in March 1953 it was open for signature.It commits Member
    States to allow women to vote and hold public office on equal terms with men.

    Source: www1.umn.edu/humanrts/instree/e2cprw.htm


  6. Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade and institution
    and Practice Similar to slavery
    Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade and institution and
    Practice Similar to slavery adopted by a Conference of Plenipotentiaries convened by
    Economic and Social Council resolution 608(XXI) of 30 April 1956 and done at Geneva
    on 7 September 1956. It recognizing that, since the conclusion of the Slavery Convention signed at Geneva on 25 September 1926, which was designed to secure the abolition of slavery and of the slave trade, further progress has been made towards this end.

    Source: www2.ohchr.org/english/law/slavetrade.htm
    www1.umn.edu/humanrts/instree/f3scas.htm


  7. Convention on the Nationality of Married Women
    Convention on the Nationality of Married Women was opened for signatur epursuantto resolution 1040 (XI)1 adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations on 29 January 1957, entered into force 11 August 1958. It aims at protecting the right of a married women to retain her nationality.
    Source: www1.umn.edu/humanrts/instree/w1cnmw.html


  8. Convention on Consent to Marriage, Minmum Age for Marriage and  Registration of Marriages
    The Convention on Consent to Marriage, Minimum Age for Marriage, and Registration of Marriages was a treaty agreed upon in the United Nations on the standards of marriage. The treaty was opened for signature and ratification by General Assembly resolution 1763 A (XVII) on 7 November 1962 and entered into force 9 December 1964. It The Convention reaffirms the consensual nature of marriages and requires the parties to establish a minimum age by law and to ensure the registration of marriages.

    Source: www2.ohchr.org/english/law/pdf/convention.pdf




  9. Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial  Discrimination
    The convention was adopted and opened for signature by the United Nations General Assembly on December 21, 1965, and entered into force on January 4, 1969. As of October 2009, it had 85 signatories and 173 parties. It is a second generation human rights instrument,which commits its members to the elimination of racial discrimination and the promotion of understanding among all races. Controversially, the Convention also requires its parties to outlaw hate speech and criminalize membership in racist organizations.

    Source: www2.ohchr.org/english/law/pdf/cerd.pdf


  10. International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights
    International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights was adopted by the United Nations
    General Assembly on December 16, 1966, and in force from March 23, 1976. It commits its
    parties to respect the civil and political rights of individuals, including the right to life,
    freedom of religion, freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, electoral rights and rights to
    due process and a fair trial.

    Source : www2.ohchr.org/english/law/ccpr.htm

  11. International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights
    International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights was adopted by the UN
    General Assembly on December 16, 1966, and in force from January 3, 1976. In it
    economic, social and cultural rights are designed to ensure the protection of people as full
    persons, based on a perspective in which people can enjoy rights, freedoms and social
    justice simultaneously.

    Source: www2.ohchr.org/english/law/cescr.htm



  12. Declaration on the Elimination of  against Women
    The Declaration on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women is a human rights proclamation issued by the united Nations General Assembly, outlining that body's views on women's rights . It was adopted by the General Assembly on 7 November 1967.The Declaration was an important precursor to the legally binding Convention on the Elimination of All forms of Discrimination Against Women.

    Source: www.unhcr.org/refworld/docid/3b00f05938.html - Similar

  13. Declaration on the Protection of Women and Children in Emergency  Armed Conflict
    Declaration on the Protection of Women and Children in Emergency Armed Conflict was
    adopted as General Assembly Resolution 3318 (XXIX) of 14 December 1974, was adopted
    to address the sufferings of civilian women and children who in period of emergency and
    armed conflict are the victims if inhuman acts.


    Source: www2.ohchr.org/english/law/protectionwomen.htm



  14. Declaration on the Protection of All Persons from Being Subjected to Torture and
    other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment
    This declaration was adopted by the General Assembly in December 1975. It contains 12 articles and a definition of torture. It also recognises that no state may permit or tolerate torture or other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. Exceptional circumstances such as a state of war or a threat of war, internal political instability or any other public emergency may not be invoked as a justification of torture or other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.

    Source: www2.ohchr.org/english/law/declarationcat.htm



  15. Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women
    Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women was adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations on 18 December 1979, and it became effective on 3 September 1981. It defines and condemns discrimination against women in the areas of politics, law, employment, education, health care, commercial transactions, domestic relations, and reproduction. It also requires signers to take action against traffic in women.
    Source: www2.ohchr.org/english/law/cedaw.htm


  16. Workers with Family Responsibilities Convention, 1981
    Workers with Family Responsibilities Convention, 1981 is an International Labour Organization Convention.It was established in 1981. It recognising the need to create effective equality of opportunity and treatment as between men and women workers with family responsibilities and between such workers and other workers

    Source: www.ilo.org/ilolex/cgi-lex/convde.pl?C156 - Cached - Similar



  17. Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment
    The text of the Convention was adopted by the United Nations General Assembly on 10 December 1984 and, following ratification by the 20th state party, it came into force on 26 June 1987. 26 June is now recognised as the International Day in Support of Torture Victims, in honour of the Convention. As of September 2010, the Convention had 147 parties. It aims to prevent torture around the world. It also requires states to take effective measures to prevent torture within their borders, and forbids states to return people to their home country if there is reason to believe they will be tortured.

    Source: www2.ohchr.org/english/law/cat.htm



  18. International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and  Members of their Families
    The International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families is an international agreement governing the protection of migrant workers and families. Signed on 18 December 1990, it entered into force on 1 July 2003 after the threshold of 20 ratifying States was reached in March 2003.

    Source: www2.ohchr.org/english/law/cmw.htm

  19. Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action
    Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action also known as VDPA, was adopted by consensus at the World Conference on Human Rights on 25 June 1993 in Vienna, Austria as a human rights declaration. It draws attention to the importance of women's rights and the rights of the "girl-child".

    Source: www.unhchr.ch/huridocda/huridoca.nsf/.../a.conf.157.23.en



  20. Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women
    The Declaration on the Elimination of Violence Against Women was adopted without vote by the United Nations General Assembly in its resolution 48/104 of 20 December 1993. Contained within it is the recognition of "the urgent need for the universal application to women of the rights and principles with regard to equality, security, liberty, integrity and dignity of all human beings". The resolution is often seen as complementary to, and a strengthening of, the work of the Convention on the Elimination of All forms of Discrimination against Women. It recalls and embodies the same rights and principles as those enshrined in such instruments as the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Articles 1 and 2 provide the most widely used definition of violence against women.

    Source: www2.ohchr.org/english/law/eliminationvaw.htm



  21. Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court
    The Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court (often referred to as the International Criminal Court Statute or the Rome Statute) is the treaty that established the international Criminal Court (ICC). It was adopted at a diplomatic conference in Rome on 17 July 1998 and it entered into force on 1 July 2002.As of October 2009, 111 states are party to the statute, and a further 38 states have signed but not ratified the treaty. Among other things, the statute establishes the court's functions, jurisdiction and structure.

    Source: untreaty.un.org/cod/icc/statute/romefra.htm

  22. Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women
    Optional Protocol to CEDAW is a side-agreement to the Convention, adopted by theGeneral Assembly of the United Nations on 6 October 1999, and in force from 22 December 2000. It establishes complaint and inquiry mechanisms for the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women(CEDAW)
    Source: www.un-documents.net/opcedaw.htm


  23. Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, especially Women and Children
    The Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, especially Women and Children (also referred to as the Trafficking Protocol) is a protocol to the Convention against transnational organised Crime. It is one of the two Palermo Protocols, the other one being the Protocol against the Smuggling of Migrant by Land, Sea and Air, adopted by the United Nations in Palermo, Italy in 2000. The Trafficking Protocol entered into force on 25 December 2003. By October 2009, the Protocol had been signed by 117 countries, and there were 133 parties

    Source: www2.ohchr.org/english/law/pdf/protocoltraffic.pdf


  24. Convention No. 183 Convention Concerning Maternity Protection
    In June 2000 the International Labour Organization (ILO) adopted a new Maternity Protection Convention and Recommendation (Convention No. 183 and Recommendation No. 191). ILO Convention No. 183 applies to all employed women, including those in atypical forms of dependent work (e.g. home workers, part-time, temporary and casual workers). It recognises protecting of women workers during pregnancy.

    Source: http://www.ilo.org/wcmsp5/groups/public/---dgreports/---gender/documents/genericdocument/wcms_114195.pdf

  25. Security Council Resolution 1325 - Security Council
    Security Council Resolution 1325 is a sub-theme of the PeaceWomen.org Theme: General Women, Peace and Security, and forms part of PeaceWomen’s framework to organize our women, peace and security resources for ease of reference and understanding. SCR1325 is binding upon all UN Member States and the adoption of the Resolution marked an important international political recognition that women and gender are relevant to international peace and security.

    Source: www.un.org/events/res_1325e.pdf


  26. SAARC Convention on Combating and Prevention of Trafficking in Women and Children for Prostitution
    In 2002, the South Asian Regional Association for Regional Cooperation (SAARC) signed a Convention on Preventing and Combating Trafficking in Women and Children for Prostitution. The aim of the Convention on Preventing and Combating Trafficking in Women and Children for Prostitution is to promote cooperation amongst Member States to effectively deal with various aspects of prevention, interdiction and suppression of trafficking in women and children; repatriation and rehabilitation of victims of trafficking and preventing the use of women and children in international prostitution networks, particularly where the SAARC Member Countries are the countries of origin, transit and destination.

    Source: www.saarc-sec.org/userfiles/conv-traffiking.pdf



  27. International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of all Migrant Workers and Members of their Families
    The United Nations International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families is aninternational agreement governing the protection of migrant workers and families. Signed on 18 December 1990, it entered into force on 1 July 2003 after the threshold of 20 ratifying states was reached in March 2003. The Committee on Migrant Workers (CMW) monitors implementation of the convention, and is one of the seven UN-linked Human rights treaty bodies.

    Source: www.bayefsky.com/general/cmw_sp_sr_2_2005.pdf



  28. Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
    The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its Optional Protocol was adopted on 13 December 2006 at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, and was opened for signature on 30 March 2007. The Convention marks a "paradigm shift" in attitudes and approaches to persons with disabilities. It takes to a new height the movement from viewing persons with disabilities as "objects" of charity, medical treatment and social protection towards viewing persons with disabilities as "subjects" with rights, who are capable of claiming those rights and making decisions for their lives based on their free and informed consent as well as being active members of society.

    Source: www2.ohchr.org/english/law/pdf/disabilities-convention.pdf
  29. Beijing Declaration 1995 The United Nations convened the Fourth World Conference on Women on 4-15 September 1995 in Beijing, China. Delegates had prepared a Declaration and Platform for Action that aimed at achieving greater equality and opportunity for women. The three previous World Conferences were in Mexico City (International Women's Year, 1975), Copenhagen (1980) and Nairobi (1985).The official name of the Conference was "The Fourth World Conference on Women: Action for Equality, Development and Peace". 189 governments and more than 5,000 representatives from 2,100 non-governmental organizations participated in the Conference.The principal themes were the advancement and empowerment of women in relation to women’s human rights, women and poverty, women and decision-making, the girl-child, violence against women and other areas of concern. The resulting documents of the Conference are The Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action. Source: http://www.un.org/womenwatch/daw/beijing/platform/
  30. Beijing + 5 Beijing + 5 was held in the General Assembly, from 5 - 9 June 2000 for Five-year Review of the implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action. And also adopted a Political Declaration and outcome document entitled "further actions and initiatives to implement the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action".Source: http:// www.un.org/womenwatch/daw/followup/beijing+5.htm
  31. Beijing + 10 Beijing + 10 was conducted from February 28 to March 11, 2005, by the UN Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) to review and appraisal of the Beijing Platform for Action. The   Objective of the review was to identify achievements, gaps and challenges in implementing the Beijing Platform for Action -signed by 189 governments- and the outcome documents, as well as the Beijing +5 Political declaration adopted at the five-year review in June 2000.
    Source: http://www.choike.org/2009/eng/informes/1665.html
  32. Beijing + 15 From 1-12 March 2010, the Commission on the Status of Women undertook a fifteen-year review of the implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action and the outcomes of the twenty-third special session of the General Assembly.   Emphasis was placed on the sharing of experiences and good practices, with a view to overcoming remaining obstacles and new challenges, including those related to the Millennium Development Goals.  Member States, representatives of non-governmental organizations and of UN entities participated in the session.  A series of parallel events provided additional opportunities for information exchange and networking.
  33. Millennium Development Goals The eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) – which range from halving extreme poverty to halting the spread of HIV/AIDS and providing     universal primary education, all by the target date of 2015 – form a blueprint agreed to by all the world’s countries and all the world’s leading development institutions. They have galvanized unprecedented efforts to meet the needs of the world’s poorest.    Source: www.ngocongo.org/oldsite/mdg.htm


 

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